History (HIST)



100 World History I - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.
This course examines the growth of civilizations and the interrelationships of peoples of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas from the birth of civilization to the eve of the Modern Era. Topics in social, intellectual, economic, and political history are covered. This course is intended for history majors and all students interested in a global historical perspective. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

101 World History II - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.
This course examines the comparative history of the world’s civilizations in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe from the dawn of the modern era (1600) to the present. Topics in social, intellectual, economic, and political history are covered. This course is intended for history majors as well as anyone seeking a global historical perspective. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

105 Introduction to Western Civilization I - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.
This course is an historical survey of Western Civilization from the early human communities through early modernism. The course is designed to further students' general education by introducing the ideas, attitudes, and institutions basic to Western Civilization. It may be of interest to history majors as well as any student seeking a broad historical perspective. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

106 Introduction to Western Civilization II - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.
This course is an historical survey of Western Civilization from early modernism to the present. Students are introduced to the ideas, attitudes, and institutions basic to Western Civilization. Topics include the political structures, social structures, forms of cultural expression, and patterns of change during key periods of Western history. This course is intended for history majors as well as any student seeking a broad historical perspective. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

109 History of the United States I - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.
This course, which covers the history of the United States from its colonial origins through the period of Reconstruction, provides an overview of the diverse peoples who interacted, settled, and influenced the history of the nation and its developing economic, social, and political institutions. The course requires students to analyze a variety of materials, think critically, and write thesis-based essays. AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: History (HIST) 109-110, 141- 142, 150-151, Black Studies (BLAS) 140A-140B, and/ or Chicano Studies (CHIC) 141A-141B combined: maximum credit, one series.

110 History of the United States II - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.
This course, which covers the history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present, provides an overview of the diverse peoples who influenced the history of the nation and its maturing economic, social, and political institutions. The course requires students to analyze a variety of materials, think critically, and write thesis-based essays. History 110 taken in conjunction with History 109, 115A, 141, 150; Black Studies 140A; or Chicano Studies 141A satisfies the District and may satisfy CSU requirements in United States History, Constitution, and American Institutions and the requirement in California state and local government. History 110 also satisfies the District and CSU requirements in California state and local government for those students who have completed equivalent United States history, Constitution, and American Ideals courses outside the State of California. Associate Degree Credit & transfer to CSU and/or private colleges and universities. UC Transfer Limitation: History (HIST) 109-110, 141-142,150- 151, Black Studies (BLAS) 140A-140B, and/or Chicano Studies (CHIC) 141A-141B combined: maximum credit, one series.

115A History of the Americas I - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.
This course is a history of the Americas from 1500 through 1870. Emphasis is placed on a comparison of the cultural forms, political institutions, social relations, and economic structures that resulted from the interactions among people of different socially defined cultures, races, ethnicities, and social classes. Topics include the emergence of the independence movements in the Americas, political conflict and civil war in the newly independent countries, and the consolidation of stable nation states by 1870. The United States Constitution and subsequent political institutions in the United States are compared to the other newly independent countries in the Americas. This course is intended for students majoring in History and those interested in the history of the Americas. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

115B History of the Americas II - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.
This course is a history of the Americas from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on the application of classical liberalism during the late nineteenth century, construction of corporist states during the mid-twentieth century, and the advent of neo-liberalism in the late twentieth century. Topics include the development of the California State Constitution, the expansion of commerce, and international relations among nations in the Western Hemisphere. This course is intended for students majoring in History and those interested in the history of the Americas. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

120 Introduction to Asian Civilizations - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.
This course examines the social, cultural, and political evolution of distinct civilizations in East, South, and Southeast Asia from prehistory to the end of the sixteenth century. Emphasis is placed on topics such as the development of indigenous religions/ philosophies, the rise and decline of regional kingdoms/dynasties, cultural achievements, and gender roles. This course is intended for transfer students planning to major in history, business, or other social science. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

121 Asian Civilizations in Modern Times - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.
This course examines the evolution of the distinct cultures, thought, and institutions in East, South, and Southeast Asia from the sixteenth century to the present through critical investigations into the impact of modernization on the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of these societies. Emphasis is placed on topics such as the first encounters with Western powers, the evolution of Western imperialism, the rise of nationalist movements and independent nation states, and their evolution and progress to the present. (FT)
AA/AS; CSU; UC.

123 U.S. History from the Asian Pacific - American Perspective 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.
This course is a review of Asian Pacific Americans in the social, economic, political, and cultural development of the United States from the 1850s to the present. The emphasis is on the Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Asian Indian, Filipino, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Lao, Hmong, and Native Hawaiian experiences. Topics include immigration and settlement patterns of diverse Asian groups, family formation and community development, American overseas expansion, and California constitutionalism. This course is intended for all students interested in history, ethnic studies, and Asian American studies. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 120. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.