2011 Spring Lit Series Archive

One Book One San Diego 2011


THE GANGSTER WE ARE ALL LOOKING FOR
By lê thi diem thúy

One Book One San Diego 2011 Events



For Once in My Life
Monday, January 24, 6:30 p.m.
Central Library, 820 E Street, San Diego, CA 92101

This film is the story of an inspiring group of people and their dream to make music. It follows the members of the Spirit of Goodwill Band while they prepare for the concert of a lifetime. As they navigate daily life, these twenty-eight musicians and singers, all with a wide range of severe mental and physical disabilities, display talent, humor and tenacity.For Once in My Life shatters preconceived notions of what it means to be disabled and reveals the individual greatness within all of us as band member cope with social adjustments all too familiar with society’s minorities.
Directed by Jim Bigham, 60 minutes, USA 2010

Book Discussion
Tuesday, January 25, 6:45–8:00 p.m.
Mira Mesa Branch Library 4121 Adams Ave., San Diego, CA 92116


MYTHOLOGY TALK: The Trung Sisters (Hai Bà Trưng)
Monday, January 31, 6:30 p.m.
Central Library, 820 E Street, San Diego, CA 92101

Dr. David Biggs of UC Riverside’s History Dept discusses the heroic Trưng Sisters of Vietnam, highly revered historical figures who over time have become akin to mythical heroes. Often depicted riding on elephants into battle, the Trung Sisters, led the first resistance movement in AD 39 against the occupying Chinese after 247 years of domination. Temples are dedicated to them, schools and other places are named after them, and a yearly holiday, occurring in February, to commemorate their deaths is observed. The stories of the Trưng sisters are cited by some historians as hints that Vietnamese society before the arrival of the Chinese was a matriarchal one, where there were no obstacles for women in assuming leadership roles.

KPBS Live Interview on “These Days” with lê thi diem thúy
(Not a public event)
 Tuesday, February 1, 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Maureen Cavanaugh hosts “These Days,” a two-hour talk show on everything from politics to the arts.

Lecture and Reception with lê thi diem thúy
Tuesday, February 1, 7:00 p.m.
La Jolla Country Day School, 9490 Genessee Avenue, La Jolla, CA 92037

Join KPBS and San Diego Public Library for the San Diego kick-off event of One Book One San Diego for a special evening featuring lê thi diem thúy, who will lecture and discuss and sign her book The Gangster We Are All Looking For. The book is is a true-life novel about a Vietnamese refugee family in San Diego, told from the perspective of the family's daughter, who is just six years old when they arrive.

Student Panel and Luncheon with Warren St. John
(Not a public event)
Wednesday, February 2, 11:15 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Francis Parker High School

Francis Parker High presents a refugee and immigrant student panel discussion and luncheon with lê thi diem thúy, author of The Gangster We Are All Looking For. The program will include digital stories produced by Francis Parker students about their experience and ethnic food reflecting the students’ background.

An Afternoon with lê thi diem thúy
Wednesday, February 2, 1:30 pm
Linda Vista Branch Library, 2160 Ulric Street, San Diego CA 92111

Linda Vista Branch Library hosts a “Meet the Author” with lê thi diem thúy, author of The Gangster We Are All Looking For. Book club participants are especially encouraged to attend.

Author talk with lê thi diem thúy
Wednesday, February 2, 6:30
Central Library, 820 E Street, San Diego, CA 92101

The author of the 2011 One Book One San Diego selection, The Gangster We Are All Looking For, conducts an author talk and book discussion of her award-winning novel.

Stories of Memory and Displacement: An African American Book Discussion
Central Library, 820 E St., San Diego, CA 92101
Monday, February 7, 6:30

Wench: A Novel by Dolen Perkins-Valdez with Dr. Camille Forbes, Literature Dept, UCSD: Heart-wrenching, intriguing, original and suspenseful, this debut novel eloquently plunges into a dark period of American history, chronicling the lives of four slave women who every summer must accompany their masters to a resort in the free state of Ohio in the mid-1850s. Drawing on research about the resort that eventually became the first black college, Wilberforce University, the novel explores the complexities of relationships in slavery and the abiding comfort of women’s friendships.

Me Facing Life: Cyntoia’s Story
Monday, February 14, 6:30 p.m.
Central Library, 820 E Street, San Diego, CA 92101

This film follows the sad and startling story of Cyntoia Brown, who is serving a life sentence for murder at the age of 16.Me Facing Life: Cyntoia’s Story takes a hard look at some of the complex social issues concerning a 16-year-old girl who is serving a life sentence for murder. The filmmaker spent nearly six years exploring her life and familial relationships in order to answer a very basic question… why? This documentary pushes aside assumptions about what we think about violence and takes a glance into the familial displacement that occurs when violence enters a home.
Directed by Daniel Birma, 60 minutes, USA, 2010

LITERATURE TALK: The Tale of Kieu (Truyện Kiều)
Wednesday, February 16, 6:30 p.m.
930 10th Ave, San Diego, CA 92101

Dr. Mariam Lam of UC Riverside’s Comparative Literature Dept discusses The Tale of Kiều, an epic poem in Vietnamese written by Nguyễn Du (1766–1820), widely regarded as the most significant work of Vietnamese literature. In 3,254 verses, the poem recounts the life, trials and tribulations of Thúy Kiều, a beautiful and talented young woman, who sacrifices herself to save her family. It is sometimes used as a source for bibliomancy (fortune-telling by book).

Mo`olelo Performing Arts Company: Stick Fly
Thursday, February 24–March 20
930 10th Ave, San Diego, CA 92101

The LeVay Family, an affluent African American family, gathers in their vacation home on Martha’s Vineyard for the weekend joined by their housekeeper's daughter. The sons—one the golden boy physician, the other an aspiring novelist—each bring their girlfriends to meet the family. As the drinks and conversation flow, the barbs begin to fly and old family secrets are revealed. A play about family obligations, class, and psychic displacement.
Written by Lydia R. Diamond, directed by Robert Barry Fleming

Stories of Memory and Displacement: An African American Book Discussion
Monday, February 28, 6:30
Central Library, 820 E St., San Diego, CA 92101

Like Trees, Walking by Ravi Howard with Dr. Camille Forbes, Literature Dept, UCSD: In the summer of 1981 the town of Mobile, Alabama awakened to find a black youth hanging from a camphor tree. While the community's leaders press the police to find a better explanation for murder than “a drug deal gone wrong,” 17-year-old Roy Deacon, son of the local black funeral director, offers the story of the body’s discovery, and the town’s struggle to reconcile the lynching with any notions that its black residents have of racial progress. Based on the true story of one of the last recorded lynchings in the U.S.

SPECIAL EVENT: Words 360: Vietnamese-American Poets & Librarians
Tuesday, March 8, 6:00 p.m.
Linda Vista Branch Library, 2160 Ulric Street, San Diego CA 92111

Featuring award-winning poet Kim Ly Bui-Burton and San Diego Vietnamese American public librarians. A poet and librarian from the Monterey Peninsula, Kim’s poems have been published in publications as diverse as Tilting the Continent: Southeast Asian American Writing, The Body Eclectic: An Anthology of Poems for Teens and I Am Becoming the Woman I’ve Wanted. Kim is the Director of the Monterey Public Library and the 2010 President of the California Library Association. Her poetry reflects her multicultural heritage, connecting the natural and human worlds with lyric intensity.

Book Discussion
Thursday, March 10, 10:30 a.m.
Tierrasanta Branch Library 4985 La Cuenta Drive, San Diego CA 92124

PHILOSOPHY TALK: Just War Theory
Monday, March 14, 6:30 p.m.
Central Library, 820 E Street, San Diego, CA 92101

Dr. Saba Bazargan of UCSD’s Philosophy department discusses the concept of Just War Theory, which deals with the justification of how and why wars are fought. Is there such a thing as a good war? And can a war, with its violence and legacy of suffering, ever be considered just? Just war theory (or bellum iustum) is a doctrine of military ethics studied by moral theologians, ethicists and international policy makers which holds that a conflict can and ought to meet the criteria of philosophical, religious or political justice, provided it follows certain conditions.

Library Night at the 2011 San Diego Latino Film Festival
Tuesday, March 15, 6:00 p.m.–10:30 p.m.
Hazard Center, 7510 Hazard Center Drive, San Diego, CA 92101

Show your San Diego Public Library card and receive a $2 discount on any general admission ticket from 6:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Library Night’s films were chosen by SDLFF to tie in with the themes presented in The Gangster We Are All Looking For.

Pushing the Elephant
Monday, March 21, 6:30 p.m.
Central Library, 820 E Street, San Diego, CA 92101

Pushing the Elephant explores the violence of war at its most personal. It chronicles the story of Rose Mapendo and how she escaped from the ethnic violence of the Democratic Republic of Congo to become a vital voice to help mend her divided country. She has assisted dozens of survivors to recover and rebuild their lives. But there is still one person Rose must teach to forgive—her daughter Nangabire. Rose Mapendo was named in 2007 as one of America’s greatest hometown hero at the Volvo for Life Hero Awards.
Directed by Beth Davenport and Elizabeth Mandel, 60 minutes, USA, 2010

Bhutto
Monday, April 18, 6:30 p.m.
Central Library, 820 E Street, San Diego, CA 92101

As the first woman to lead an Islamic nation, Benazir Bhutto led a life of Shakespearean dimensions. When the former prime minister of Pakistan was struck down by an assassin in December 2007, her untimely death sent shock waves throughout the world, transforming Bhutto from political messiah to a martyr in the hearts of her people. The film explores the personal wounds of war-like violence through the prism of state and nation.
Directed by Duane Baughman and Johnny O’Hara, 60 minutes, USA, 2010

Welcome to Shelbyville
Monday, April 18, 6:30 p.m.
Central Library, 820 E Street, San Diego, CA 92101

Set in the heart of America’s Bible Belt, this film focuses on a small Southern town as they grapple with rapid demographic change and issues of immigrant integration. The film captures the complexity of the African American, Latino, white, and Somali residents as their lives intertwine against the backdrop of a crumbling economy and the election of a new president.
Directed by Kim Snyder, 60 minutes, USA, 2010